Category: SOCIALSCIENCES

The Oxford Handbook of the Radical Right

The Oxford Handbook of the Radical Right The resurgence of strong radical right-wing parties and movements constitutes one of the most significant political changes in democratic states during the past several decades, particularly in Europe. The radical right’s comeback has notably attracted interest from political scientists, sociologists, and historians, although the majority of past research

The Oxford Handbook of Gender and Conflict

The Oxford Handbook of Gender and Conflict Traditionally, much of the work studying war and conflict has focused on men. Men commonly appear as soldiers, commanders, casualties, and civilians. Women, by contrast, are invisible as combatants, and, when seen, are typically pictured as victims. The field of war and conflict studies is changing: more recently,

The Oxford Handbook of Deliberative Democracy

The Oxford Handbook of Deliberative Democracy Deliberative democracy has been one of the main games in contemporary political theory for two decades, growing enormously in size and importance in political science and many other disciplines. This handbook takes stock of deliberative democracy as a research field, in philosophy, in various research programmes in the social

Displacements: Reading Space and Time in Moving Image Installations

Displacements: Reading Space and Time in Moving Image Installations This book is about the aesthetics and politics of contemporary artists’ moving image installations, and the ways that they use temporal and spatial relationships in the gallery to connect with geopolitical issues. Displaced from the cinema, moving images increasingly address themes of movement and change in

Rational Choice and Strategic Conflict: The Subjectivistic Approach to Game and Decision Theory

Rational Choice and Strategic Conflict: The Subjectivistic Approach to Game and Decision Theory “This book is refreshing, innovative and important for several reasons. Perhaps most importantly, it attempts to reconcile game theory with one-person decision theory by viewing a game as a collection of one-person decision problems. As natural as this approach may seem, it